mildredsfierce:


"It was December 1944, and the Battle of the Bulge was raging across the Ardennes Forest of Nazi-occupied Belgium. A woman with a German accent, wearing an American soldier’s uniform, sat shivering in the snow in the midst of some American soldiers. German troops were moving in, closer and closer. She fingered the pistol in her pocket. She now had to face the thought she had been trying to avoid ever since she had come back to Europe: would the Germans find her, and if so, what would they do to her? Her name was Marlene Dietrich. 
She had been born in Berlin, Germany, in 1901. As a young woman, she had become a stage entertainer and then a successful movie star, first in her native Germany and then in America. Her films were so popular in Germany that in 1937, Adolf Hitler (who owned a collection of her movies) sent personal messengers to Marlene to offer her a very rewarding movie career: she could be the ‘queen of German film’ if only she would return from the United States to Germany and make films for the Third Reich.
She told the messengers that she was currently under contract to make films in Hollywood with her longtime mentor, Jewish-German director Josef von Sternberg, but that she would gladly make a German film if he would be allowed to direct it. There was a tense silence. Marlene finally broke it. ‘Do I rightly understand,’ she asked, ‘that you refuse to have Mr. von Sternberg make a film in your country because he’s Jewish?’
The German messengers began to talk at once. They said that Marlene had been ‘infected’ with false American propoganda and that there was no anti-Semitism in Germany. Marlene knew better. Hitler had drastically altered the Germany of her youth…”

-Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue by Kathryn J. Atwood.

mildredsfierce:

"It was December 1944, and the Battle of the Bulge was raging across the Ardennes Forest of Nazi-occupied Belgium. A woman with a German accent, wearing an American soldier’s uniform, sat shivering in the snow in the midst of some American soldiers. German troops were moving in, closer and closer. She fingered the pistol in her pocket. She now had to face the thought she had been trying to avoid ever since she had come back to Europe: would the Germans find her, and if so, what would they do to her? Her name was Marlene Dietrich.

She had been born in Berlin, Germany, in 1901. As a young woman, she had become a stage entertainer and then a successful movie star, first in her native Germany and then in America. Her films were so popular in Germany that in 1937, Adolf Hitler (who owned a collection of her movies) sent personal messengers to Marlene to offer her a very rewarding movie career: she could be the ‘queen of German film’ if only she would return from the United States to Germany and make films for the Third Reich.

She told the messengers that she was currently under contract to make films in Hollywood with her longtime mentor, Jewish-German director Josef von Sternberg, but that she would gladly make a German film if he would be allowed to direct it. There was a tense silence. Marlene finally broke it. ‘Do I rightly understand,’ she asked, ‘that you refuse to have Mr. von Sternberg make a film in your country because he’s Jewish?’

The German messengers began to talk at once. They said that Marlene had been ‘infected’ with false American propoganda and that there was no anti-Semitism in Germany. Marlene knew better. Hitler had drastically altered the Germany of her youth…”

-Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue by Kathryn J. Atwood.

21 Sep 14 @ 9:53 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Fred Astaire & Rita Hayworth in You Were Never Lovelier, 1942.

Fred Astaire & Rita Hayworth in You Were Never Lovelier, 1942.

21 Sep 14 @ 9:10 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
21 Sep 14 @ 9:09 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Carole Lombard, 1941

Carole Lombard, 1941

21 Sep 14 @ 6:15 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Concept art for Mary Poppins

21 Sep 14 @ 6:15 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
fuckindiva:

Gun Crazy (aka Deadly is the Female) (1950)

fuckindiva:

Gun Crazy (aka Deadly is the Female) (1950)

21 Sep 14 @ 6:14 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

"Margo Channing is the star of the theater. She made her first stage appearance at the age of four in Midsummer’s Night Dream. She played a fairy and entered, quite unexpectedly, stark naked. She has been a star ever since. Margo is a great star, a true star. She never was or never will be anything less or anything else.”

21 Sep 14 @ 6:13 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Elizabeth Taylor looking radiant on her wedding day to Richard Burton, March 15th, 1964. 

Elizabeth Taylor looking radiant on her wedding day to Richard Burton, March 15th, 1964. 

21 Sep 14 @ 2:45 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
gingerrogerss:

Myrna Loy and William Powell in After the Thin Man (1936)

gingerrogerss:

Myrna Loy and William Powell in After the Thin Man (1936)

21 Sep 14 @ 2:34 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

eugeneskelly:

I don’t always fall in love, but when I do, it’s with dead men.

21 Sep 14 @ 2:33 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

cromwyll:

infinite list of my favourite movies

Dead Poets Society [1989 dir. peter weir]

"We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. To quote from Whitman, "O me! O life!… of the questions of these recurring; of the endless trains of the faithless… of cities filled with the foolish; what good amid these, O me, O life?” Answer. That you are here - that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse. That the powerful play and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?”

21 Sep 14 @ 2:32 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Bette Davis & John Garfield│ Hollywood Canteen, 1944

21 Sep 14 @ 2:13 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

gloriaswanson:

Vivien Leigh signing autographs in St. Martin’s Lane (1938)

21 Sep 14 @ 2:12 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
gingerrogerss:

Vivien Leigh photographed by Roloff Beny, 1958

gingerrogerss:

Vivien Leigh photographed by Roloff Beny, 1958

21 Sep 14 @ 12:35 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Rita Hayworth, 1957.

Rita Hayworth, 1957.

21 Sep 14 @ 12:34 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
OS